Month: January 2011

What I’m Reading Now: Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah

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From Amazon.com:

Hannah goes a little too far into Lifetime movie territory in her latest, an epic exploration of the complicated terrain between best friends—one who chooses marriage and motherhood while the other opts for career and celebrity. The adventures of poor, ambitious Tully Hart and middle-class romantic Kate Mularkey begin in the 1970s, but don’t really get moving until about halfway into the book, when Tully, who claws her way to the heights of broadcast journalism, discovers it’s lonely at the top, and Katie, a stay-at-home Seattle housewife, forgets what it’s like to be a rebellious teen. What holds the overlong narrative together is the appealing nature of Tully and Katie’s devotion to one another even as they are repeatedly tested by jealousy and ambition. Katie’s husband, Johnny, is smitten with Tully, and Tully, who is abandoned by her own booze-and-drug-addled mother, relishes the adoration from Katie’s daughter, Marah. Hannah takes the easy way out with an over-the-top tear-jerker ending, though her upbeat message of the power of friendship and family will, for some readers, trump even the most contrived plot twists.

My Thoughts on Truly, Madly

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I picked this book to read because it was in the “Librarian Recommends” section. I did not know that it was a series, but I do not feel that I missed anything by not reading the books before this one.

I liked Truly, Madly. I liked the heroine. I liked the love interest. It was a good, fun, quick read. But I do not think that I will read the books before this one. The one thing that I did not like about this book was the fact that she kept her psychic powers quiet and it affected all of her relationships. She gets “outed” in Truly, Madly, and it is a huge relief! So I am interested in following this character from this point forward.

What I’m Reading Now: Truly, Madly

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From Amazon.com:

With a name like Lucy Valentine, and the legacy of a hugely successful family matchmaking business, Valentine, Inc., one would think that Lucy would be set in her career. There is only one problem: she doesn’t have the knack for matchmaking. Not even when it comes to her own love life. Lucy blames this lack on a freak accident, during which an electrical surge deprived her of her matchmaking abilities but left her with the power to find lost objects. So Lucy makes the best of her abilities and helps the city of Boston locate lost items, including someone’s missing engagement ring, which she happens to find on a dead body. Lucky for her, a handsome private detective just happens to work upstairs. Lucy is a charming and lovable enough character to guide the reader through Webber’s unbelievably zany but truly irresistible mix of clever romance and a wildly inventive mystery. –Claire Orphan

My Thoughts On Escape by Jessop

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I really liked this book. But, it got into my head a bit too much, I think. I talked to my friends and members of my bookclub about this book for days.

What Jessop did, escape Polygamy with her eight kids, had never been done before. Women had left but never before with all of their kids.

Her journey and the abuse she suffered was just horrible. Parts of the book are really sad and upsetting but you just keep reading because you want to get to the part where she, well, escapes.

Escape by Jessop

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From Amazon.com: Seventeen years after being forced into a polygamous marriage, Jessop escaped from the cultlike Fundamentalist Church of Latter Day Saints with her eight children. She recounts the horrid events that led her to break free from the oppressive world she knew and how she has managed to survive since escaping, despite threats and legal battles with her husband and the Church. Though sometimes her retelling overflows with colorful foreshadowing and commentary on how exceptional she is, the everyday details she reveals about this polygamous society are devastating and tragic. Frasier delivers Jessop’s words in a soft voice that develops intriguingly from an innocent and naïve tone into a more assertive and self-confident one that mirrors Jessop’s journey. She maintains the same rhythm, but through the inspired words of the text, she really embraces Jessop’s persona. Copyright © Reed Business Information